javascript contador Skip to content

Readness – To share and know what your friends are reading on the Internet

Readness - To share and know what your friends are reading on the Internet

Readness is an extension of Google Chrome that allows us to inform our friends about what we are reading on the Internet at all times. The recording can be activated or deactivated with the icon that the plugin adds in our browser, generating statistics on the topics that our network of contacts uses to consult and allowing to discover content that, otherwise, could pass by.

It is curious the evolution that link recommendation sites have been having in recent years. At first we began to see how models of the type digg.com they reproduce like rabbits, where users manually reported the links they wanted to recommend while waiting for their contacts or the entire community to discover said content. Time passes and the twitter model conquers many of these users, recommending links through a microblogging network is much more comfortable and natural than reporting them on content aggregator sites, with which many of the digg-like they fall under their own weight and are no longer used. Now we see a third model, in which users could record their navigation by automatically sharing the result.

An exciting evolution, although the third model is not yet so established (personally I am not convinced by having to activate or deactivate a recording of the sites I visit).

Readness – To share and know what your friends are reading on the Internet

Readness - To share and know what your friends are reading on the Internet

Readness is an extension of Google Chrome that allows us to inform our friends about what we are reading on the Internet at all times. The recording can be activated or deactivated with the icon that the plugin adds in our browser, generating statistics on the topics that our network of contacts uses to consult and allowing to discover content that, otherwise, could pass by.

It is curious the evolution that link recommendation sites have been having in recent years. At first we began to see how models of the type digg.com they reproduce like rabbits, where users manually reported the links they wanted to recommend while waiting for their contacts or the entire community to discover said content. Time passes and the twitter model conquers many of these users, recommending links through a microblogging network is much more comfortable and natural than reporting them on content aggregator sites, with which many of the digg-like they fall under their own weight and are no longer used. Now we see a third model, in which users could record their navigation by automatically sharing the result.

An exciting evolution, although the third model is not yet so established (personally I am not convinced by having to activate or deactivate a recording of the sites I visit).